FAQ

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Which hospitals are the sites of clinical rotations?

 
We spend the majority of our time at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. We also spend a total of 5 1/2 blocks at Nationwide Children's Hospital, in addition to spending time at the Central Ohio Poison Center located there. We spend 2 blocks at Ohio State University Hospital East, which is the university’s affiliated community hospital. We do 2 blocks at Riverside Methodist Hospital. Our trauma surgical critical care block is at Grant Medical Center. One block is spent at another busy local community hospital, Mt. Carmel Medical Center. To round out the residency experience, we offer the option of spending a month working at Kaiser Permanente in Honolulu, Hawaii.
 

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Do you have an Ultrasound teaching program?

 
Ultrasound is an integral tool for emergency physicians and a strong focus of the Emergency Medicine Residency Program at Ohio State Wexner Medical Center. Residents have a longitudinal ultrasound experience, with both a dedicated longitudinal curriculum and integration into clinical shifts.
 
Our program is at the leading edge, with up-to-date ultrasound machines, wireless connectivity and a state-of-the-art skills training area. Our nationally-renowned RDMS faculty champion training and use of ultrasound in emergency medicine and critical care at this facility and worldwide. Upon graduation, our residents become credentialed in emergency indications for ultrasound, and many have taken positions as ultrasound directors at their new facilities.
 
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What is the presence of faculty in the ED? What are their backgrounds?

 
Full-time EM faculty are present twenty-four hours a day with quadruple coverage during the busiest hours and double coverage 24/7 the remaining time. . All EM faculty are board certified or board eligible in Emergency Medicine. Other board certifications include Internal Medicine, Critical Care Medicine, Undersea and Hyperbaric Medicine, Sports Medicine, and Pediatrics. Additional faculty have completed fellowship training in Geriatrics, Ultrasound, EMS, Simulation, Administration, and Research.
 

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What is the accreditation status of OSU's EM program?

 
The three-year residency program is fully accredited by the Residency Review Committee of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. Residents completing the program are eligible for board certification in Emergency Medicine. We currently offer 16 categorical Emergency Medicine positions. Additionally, we offer two Emergency Medicine/Internal Medicine Residency program positions. The Emergency Medicine/Internal Medicine Residency Program is a five-year, non-ACGME accredited program; however residents will be eligible to sit for both the American Board of Emergency Medicine and American Board of Internal Medicine board exams after completion of training.
 

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How close is x-ray to the ED? Who reads the films and when?

 
OSU has a computerized "PACS" radiology system which allows for quick access to any study ordered. Imaging study results performed at any OSU clinical site also are fully integrated into our electronic medical record system (Epic). The Emergency Department has its own 24-hour X-ray and CT suites located within the department . Radiologists are always in-house reading ED films, and are located within the emergency department to facilitate quick consultation when needed. Our emergency radiologists enjoy discussing cases and reviewing images with members of the emergency medicine team.
 

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What is the availability of general labs and ABG's?

 
ED laboratory tests receive priority in the central laboratory services of the hospital. Lab turnaround for ED specimens is ideally within 30-60 minutes. ABGs and other point of care tests are processed in the emergency department with results available within five minutes.
 

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What is the trauma experience like at OSU?

 
The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center has an active trauma service with a Level 1 Trauma Center designation. Our Emergency Department receives patients from the community as well as trauma referrals from throughout Central and Southeastern Ohio. Emergency Medicine residents are an integral part of the trauma team in all trauma resuscitations.
 
Second- and third-year residents in the Emergency Department participate in trauma resuscitations both as trauma team leaders and airway managers. Second-year residents also spend time on the Trauma Surgery Critical Care team at Grant Medical Center, which manages a high proportion of penetrating trauma patients as the only other adult Level 1 Trauma Center in the city.
 

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How is the resident's performance evaluated?

 
Each resident's performance is evaluated by those supervising his or her activities. Faculty complete evaluations for residents after every emergency department shift; these evaluations include progress on EM milestones as well as narrative comments. Nurses, pharmacists, and medical students provide performance feedback as well. Additional evaluations are completed by other departments at the conclusion of each off-service rotation. Clinical performance metrics (e.g., patients per hour, patient satisfaction) are provided periodically.
 
Faculty evaluations are available for resident review at any time via our learning management system, E-Value/Medhub. Faculty coaches meet with residents to review feedback and develop improvement goals at least three times a year. Resident performance also is reviewed semi-annually by the Clinical Compentency Committee; a written summary of the CCC’s recommendations is provided to each resident, and the Residency Program Leadership. Residents take the national ABEM In-Training Exam every February, and a mock oral boards practice exam occurs every year in June.
 

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How are the faculty evaluated?

 
Individual faculty members are formally evaluated monthly by the EM residents and reviewed by the program director and department chair at the faculty's annual review. Summaries of these evaluations are communicated to the faculty.
 

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How are the specific rotations evaluated?

 
Rotations are evaluated by the attending physicians and the program director based on feedback received from residents. In addition, the curriculum is continuously evaluated by both residents and faculty. Our curriculum has been adapted every year to make the resident experience a better one, and residents are the driving force behind the changes that are made.
 

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Where are your residents from and where do they go?

 
You can check out our residents' page to see where everyone is from. Recent graduates are working in Minnesota, California, Nevada, Virginia, Texas, Massachusetts, and Columbus, among other places.
 

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What is your pediatric experience like?

 
Excellent! We spend 1 1/2 blocks as interns, and two blocks each as second and third years at Nationwide Children's Hospital. We also have monthly conference time dedicated to pediatrics with pediatric emergency medicine trained faculty in attendance. See the curriculum page for more details.
 
Nationwide Children's Hospital features brand new facilities, including a new 130-bed emergency department. It is a tertiary care pediatric center and a Level I Trauma Center. This ED has an annual census of over 88,000 patients. Residents are the primary caregivers but work under the supervision and guidance of pediatric emergency medicine boarded faculty physicians. The Pediatric EM rotation offers an outstanding clinical experience, varied pathology, extensive bedside teaching and a two week rotation focusing on neonatal resuscitation in our neonatal intensive care unit.
 

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